Footnote Evangelism

Tony Woodlief writes about Penguin Classics.

It struck me recently, however, that the editors at Penguin assume—most likely with good reason—that their readers have virtually no biblical knowledge. Thus when the Count says, in Bram Stoker’s Dracula, “But a stranger in a strange land, he is no one,” the editor dutifully provides a footnote to explain that this alludes to the book of Exodus. . . . maybe this will prove to be a postmodern form of evangelism. We can’t get most intellectuals within spitting distance of a church any more, but maybe we can reach them through footnotes.

2 thoughts on “Footnote Evangelism”

  1. We can’t get most intellectuals within spitting distance of a church any more…

    Maybe not, but I know I see a lot of what would thought to be intelligent people spitting. Men in coats and ties, spitting. Women in skirts and heels, spitting.

    Please stop it!!!

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