‘Trust No One,’ by Gregg Hurwitz

Trust No One

This should end my run of Gregg Hurwitz reviews for a while. I’m enjoying his books, but I’ve read everything available that interests me for the time being. So I’m happy to end on a positive note by saying I enjoyed Trust No One quite a lot.

Nick Horrigan made a terrible mistake 17 years ago, when he was 17 years old. Because of it his family was shattered, and he spent a long time on the road, living under the radar. Now he’s back at home in Los Angeles, but he’s still keeping a low profile. He’s learned to be cautious and not to take risks.

Until the night Secret Service agents break into his apartment and drag him off to a nuclear power plant. A terrorist has taken control of the spent fuel facility, they tell him. He says he will speak to only one person – Nick Horrigan. Nick is baffled. He has no knowledge of this man. But he agrees to go in and talk to him. Things go very, very wrong, and then Nick is on the run again with a bag full of money and a few clues, accused of terrorism in his own right.

Nick has two choices – to run away, as he did 17 years ago, or to emulate the man he respected most in his life by uncovering secrets, taking the fight to his enemies, and trusting… a few people.

This story was a little less over the top than a lot of Hurwitz’s books. It was a little more grounded, though far from a likely scenario. I was particularly impressed with the handling of politics. Although political parties aren’t directly named, Nick’s opinions are easily recognizable as liberal. However, there are surprises – even an implied criticism of gun control.

I enjoyed Trust No One very much. It’s not only a thriller but a story about coming of age and a character reintegrating into human relationships.

Cautions for language and violence.

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