Tag Archives: Tim Challies

A Few Questions for God-bloggers of 2003

Joe Carter, formerly of The Evangelical Outpost, is wicking out the nostalgia in me by profiling three God-bloggers who started blogging in 2003, a year before I started this lit-blog. Like Joe, I have admired these men for a long time. They helped shaped the blogosphere, or it feels like they did for me.

Of Tim Challies, Jared Wilson, and Justin Taylor, he asks these questions:

  1. What was your motivation for starting a blog?
  2. How has blogging changed your life over the past decade?
  3. What is one lesson you’ve learned from blogging about writing, communicating, etc.?
  4. How has blogging itself or the blogosphere changed in these ten years?

Tim says: “I learned that I think best when I write. I don’t really know what I believe until I write it down and work it through in my word processor, and in that way writing has been a critical part of my spiritual development. For some reason it took me beginning a blog to figure this out.”

Jared says: “Then one of our guys said, “Why don’t we stop the clunky email chains and do this on a weblog?” I had no idea what that was, but we all kinda said, ‘Okay.'”

Justin: “Maybe I’m wrong about this, but I think we are more bored with blogs than we were ten years ago. Our attention spans are even shorter as we want to hear from and interact with more people but with fewer characters — hence the rise of Twitter. What was a short piece ten years ago is now almost considered ‘long form.'”

How Has Technology Changed You?

Tim Challies asks, “Do you own technology, or does it own you?”

I heard an interview on the Mars Hill Audio Journal a few weeks ago during which Nicholas Carr observed how many books exist on Christianity and politics or culture but very few on Christianity and technology or how technology has or could shape the way we think of ourselves and the world. Tim Challies’ book on the subject should be worthy reading.